The eight auspicious symbols of Tibetan Buddhism

The eight auspicious symbols of Tibetan Buddhism
The following bowls come with the 8 Tibetan Symbols Of Good Fortune design.

The eight auspicious symbols of Tibetan Buddhism consist of: parasol, pair of fishes, treasure vase, lotus, white-spiraling conch shell, endless knot, victory banner, and golden wheel. Groupings of eight auspicious symbols were originally used in India at ceremonies such as an investiture or coronation of a king. In Buddhism, these eight symbols of good fortune represent the offerings made by the gods to Shakyamuni Buddha immediately after he gained enlightenment.

The Parasol (umbrella): This was a traditional Indian symbol of protection and royalty. The parasol denoted wealth and status – the more carried in a person’s entourage, the more influential the person was; 13 parasols defining the status of king.In Buddhist mythology, a jeweled umbrella is said to have been given to the Buddha by the king of the nagas. Symbolically, the protection provided by the parasol is from the heat of suffering, desire, obstacles, illness and harmful forces.

The Two Golden Fishes: In Buddhism, the fish symbolize happiness as they have complete freedom of movement in the water. They represent fertility and abundance. Often drawn in the form of carp which are regarded in the Orient as sacred on account of their elegant beauty, size and life-span.

The Treasure Vase: In Tibet, wealth vases sealed with precious and sacred substances are commonly placed upon altars and on mountain passes, or buried at water springs. The symbol is often shown as a highly ornate, traditional-shaped vase with a flaming jewel or jewels protruding from its mouth.

The Lotus Flower: The lotus blossoms unstained from the watery mire; it is a symbol of purity, renunciation and divinity.

The Right-Spiraling Conch Shell: The conch shell is an emblem of power, authority and sovereignty; its blast is believed to banish evil spirits, avert natural disasters, and scare away poisonous creatures. In Indian culture, different types of conch shell were associated with the different castes and with male and female.

The Endless Knot: This symbol was originally associated with Vishnu and represented his devotion for his consort Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and good fortune. It symbolizes the Buddha’s endless wisdom and compassion. It also can represent continuity or dependent origination as the underlying reality of existence.

The Victory Banner: These were traditionally carried in battle. Great warriors would often have banners with their own emblems, the banners being carried on the back of their chariots. Krishna (an incarnation of Vishnu) had a banner bearing the garuda bird. In early Buddhism, the banner represented Buddha’s victorious enlightenment with his overcoming the armies of Mara (hindrances and defilements).

The Golden Wheel: The wheel is an ancient Indian symbol of creation, sovereignty, protection, and the sun. The six-spoked wheel was associated with Vishnu and was know as the Sudarshana Chakra. The wheel represents motion, continuity and change, forever moving onwards like the circular wheel of the heavens.

Reference: buddhistinformation.com

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Cultural Roots – Singing Bowls and Gongs